Banner

Faqs

  • Are super B batteries safe?

    Super B batteries are based on Lithium Iron Phosphate technology (LiFePO4). This Lithium Ion technology used in super B batteries is the safest Lithium Ion technology available today. On top of that our bespoke casing and electronics further increase safety and durability.

  • Capacity

    Super B 2600 refers to 2.6 Ah (Amps/Hour), which represents the real nominal capacity under maximum continuous load. How different this is from lead-acid batteries where manufacturers provide a 20 hour rating. For example the 7 Ah lead-acid battery can be discharged over a period of 20 hours with a 0.35 Amp load. This is not very practical, as the same 7 Ah battery discharged with a 2,5 Amp load, for example a 25 Watt light bulb, will yield no more than 1.4 Ah of energy. The lead-acid battery, therefore, has less capacity when the load increases, which means that you can start more often with the super B. This phenomenon is called the Peukert component, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peukert's_law.

  • Starting Current

    We use a 10-second rating instead of CCA for the super B batteries. The 10-second rating is easy to understand: it represents the amount of current a battery can produce during 10 seconds without being damaged. The super B 2600 can deliver a current of 150 Amps during 10 seconds. The batteries can deliver higher currents for shorter periods and lower currents for longer periods.

  • How can I charge a super B battery?

    The super batteries can be charged with almost all vehicles, up to a maximum of 14.4 Volts. Do not overcharge, as this will damage the battery. The super B charges much faster than conventional batteries: charging a lead-acid battery takes 7 to 14 hours, during which the internal resistance increases and the charge current decreases. The super B 2600 can be charged within 1 hour at a charge current of 3 Amps. If the charge current is increased to 6 Amps, it will charge in 30 minutes.

  • What charger can I use?

    We recommend to use the appropriate super B charger to charge super B batteries. Do not use a lead-acid charger, as these chargers are optimized for a different battery technology and make use of methods for charging and safeguarding which are unsuitable for super B batteries.

  • How long can I store a super B battery?

    As super B batteries have a very low self-discharge rate (approximately 10 % per year), the batteries will last for several years in storage.

  • How can I connect the battery?

    The super B batteries are designed with screw terminals, this makes it easy to replace the stock lead-acid battery. The super B batteries are shipped with two bolds and plastic end caps to fit to the wires on your vehicle

  • Can I use a super B battery in F.I.M.?

    The F.I.M. has changed the rule for stock racing regarding battery use: 2.7.9.5 Battery: The Battery may be replaced. If replaced, its nominal capacity must be equal to or higher than the Homologated type. The F.I.M. has approved the super B batteries to be used as replacement batteries.

  • Voltage

    The imprinted voltage refers to the nominal battery voltage. Always observe the correct voltage when connecting to a load or a charger. Do not proceed if the voltage differs. The open circuit voltage (OCV) on a fully charged battery can be slightly higher than the nominal; the closed circuit voltage (CCV) represents the battery voltage under load or on charge and the readings will vary accordingly.

  • Capacity

    Capacity represents the specific energy in ampere-hours (Ah). Manufacturers often overrate a battery by giving a higher Ah rating than it can provide. You can use a battery with different Ah (but correct voltage), provided the rating is high enough. Chargers have some tolerance to batteries with different Ah ratings. A larger battery will take longer to charge than a small one.

  • What is the CCA rating?

    The cold cranking ampere (CCA) rating refers to the number of amperes a battery can deliver for 30 seconds at a temperature of -18°C (0°F) before the voltage drops to 1.20 volts per cell, or 7.20 volts for a 12V battery. A 12V battery that has a rating of 550 CCA means that the battery will provide 550 amps for 30 seconds at -18°C (0°F) before the voltage falls to 7.20V.

  • What is the MCA rating?

    The marine cranking ampere (MCA) rating refers to the number of amperes a battery can deliver for 30 seconds at a temperature of 0°C (32°F) until the battery voltage drops to 7.20 volts for a 12V battery. A 12V battery that has a MCA rating of 725 MCA means that the battery will give 725 amperes for 30 seconds at 0°C (32°F) before the voltage falls to 7.20V. The MCA is sometimes called the cranking amperes or CA.

  • What is the HCA rating?

    The abbreviation HCA stands for hot cranking amps. It is the same as MCA, CA or CCA, except that the temperature at which the test is conducted is 26.7°C (80°F ).

  • What is the C rating?

    C-rates specify charge and discharge currents. At 1C, the battery charges and discharges at a current that is par with the marked Ah rating; at 0.5C the current is half, and at 0.1C it is one tenth. On charge, 1C charges a good battery in about one hour; 0.5C takes 2 hours and 0.1C 10 to 14 hours. http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/what_is_the_c_rate

  • Load:

    Also known as electromotive force (EMF), the load draws energy from the battery. Internal battery resistance and depleting state-of-charge cause the voltage to drop.

  • Watts and Volt-amps (VA)

    Power drawn from a battery is expressed in watts (W) or volt-amps (VA). Watt is the real power that is being metered; VA is the apparent power that determines the wiring sizing and the circuit breakers. On a purely resistive load, watt and VA readings are alike; a reactive load such as an inductive motor or florescent light causes a drop in the power factor (pf) from the ideal one (1) to 0.7 or lower. For example, a pf of 0.7 has a power efficiency of 70.

  • P = U * I (W = V * A)

    Capacity represents the specific energy in ampere-hours (Ah). Manufacturers often overrate a battery by giving a higher Ah rating than it can provide. You can use a battery with different Ah (but correct voltage), provided the rating is high enough. Chargers have some tolerance to batteries with different Ah ratings. A larger battery will take longer to charge than a small one.